Why is health advocacy so important today

After years of frustration, help for people with severe mental illness and their families can move. The Mental Health Crisis Assistance Act for Families (to be introduced at the U.S. Congress 2015) contains many provisions to improve quality and access to mental health. The Bill provides:

Clarification of the HIPAA data protection law by allowing more comprehensive disclosure of parents and careers of minors.

Provides an exception to the Medicaid mental health exclusion policy to increase the number of beds in inpatient mental health facilities.

Enables court-supported outpatient care for high-risk patients who refuse treatment.

Promote telepsychiatric programs in rural communities. Increase support for research and education.

Providing legal protection for doctors who volunteer at the city’s psychiatric clinic.

Promote the use of best practices and evidence-based medicine from programs supported by the federal government.

Increase support for research and education.

 
Providing legal protection for doctors who volunteer at the city’s psychiatric clinic.

Promote the use of best practices and evidence-based medicine from programs supported by the federal government.

Why is Congress so interested in mental health issues? Well, maybe it doesn’t hurt that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Tim Murphy (R-Pen.), Is a former psychologist and a strong ally of the mental health community. However, the bill also supports decades of advocacy for providers who care about the quality and accessibility of mental health care. To highlight the systemic obstacles faced by these patients, service providers represent congress both individually and through their professional associations. They wrote letters of agreement, served on round tables, fought for candidates, testified before Congress, and coordinated legislative meetings and events. Some have helped pass the law at the state and local levels.

And perhaps most importantly, they drew attention to the important issue of social justice that affects millions of people in our country. Even though the bill is far from Congress, its existence is a good reminder of what leading healthcare providers can do for their patients. In the advanced course of this article we will discuss the concept of advocacy and discuss how service providers can improve patient care. However, health professionals have a long tradition of advocacy for patients. In the context of health care, Earnest and colleagues define advocacy as: actions taken by doctors to promote social, economic, educational and political changes that reduce suffering and threats to human health and well-being caused by professionals. Identification of jobs and expertise.

human health

The practice of patient representation has been approved by several professional societies, including the American Medical Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians. There are also movements to integrate legal training into the health services curriculum. While advocacy has always been an important part of health practice, advocacy is very relevant today given the broad changes that were implemented (but not yet implemented) by the Health Reform Act. Harold F. Miller, President and CEO of the Center for Health Care Reform and Reform, reached this point in his talk at the 2015 ACEP leadership and advocacy conference. The biggest problem with health care reform, he told Miller, is that we often burden problems with profit. A good example is the current struggle to take risks. Payers are actively committed to steps that transfer their own risk to patients, doctors and hospitals (an important example is high deductible health insurance).

Why is health advocacy so important today
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